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NOTEWORTHY RECORDS OF THE 2005 ATLANTIC HURRICANE SEASON

Most Numerous

  • 26 Named Storms (previous record: 21 in 1933)
  • 13 Hurricanes (previous record: 12 in 1969)
  • Four major hurricanes hitting the U.S. (previous record: three in 2004)
  • Three Category 5 Hurricanes (previous record: two in 1960 and 1961)
  • Seven Tropical Storms before August 1 (previous record: five in 1997)
  • Two-Year Consecutive Total of Tropical Storms: 41
    (previous record: 32 most recently in 1995-96)
  • Two-Year Consecutive Total of Hurricanes: 24
    (previous record: 21 in 1886-87)
  • Two-Year Consecutive Total of Major Hurricanes: 13
    (ties record in 1950-51)
  • Two-Year Consecutive Major Hurricane Landfalls: Seven
    (previous record: five in 1954-55)
  • Two -Year Consecutive Florida Major Hurricane Landfalls: Five
    (previous record: three in 1949-50)
  • Three-Year Consecutive Total of Tropical Storms: 57
    (previous record: 43 most recently in 2002-04)
  • Three-Year Consecutive Total of Hurricanes: 30
    (previous record: 27 in 1886-88)
  • Three-Year Consecutive Total of Major Hurricanes: 16
    (ties record in 1949-51 and 1950-52)

Costliest
Hurricane: Katrina (at least $80 billion)
(previous record Andrew, $26.5 billion - 1992 dollars)

Deadliest
U.S. Hurricane since 1928: Katrina (at least 1,300)

Strongest

  • Hurricane in the Atlantic Basin: Wilma 882 millibars (mb)
    (previous record: Gilbert at 888 mb)
  • Three of the six strongest hurricanes on record: Wilma 882 mb (1st), Rita
    897 mb (4th), Katrina 902 mb (6th)
    July hurricane: Emily (155 mph top sustained winds)
    (previous record: Dennis (150 mph) in 2005; Hurricane #1 (140 mph) in 1926

Information from NOAA Commerce Dept November 2005

Fast Facts: Nine out of ten hurricane fatalities are caused by the storm surge.

 

Fast Facts: As of August 30th 2005, the National Hurricane Center lists Hurricane Andrew in 1992, as the most destructive storm to hit the United States. It caused damage estimated at $26.5 billion and was a category five hurricane. Katrina...............$$$$$$$$$$$

 

Fast Facts: What is the "Eye" The "eye" is a roughly circular area of comparatively light winds and fair weather found at the center of a severe tropical cyclone. Although the winds are calm at the axis of rotation, strong winds may extend well into the eye. Credit NOAA NHC

Saffir/Simpson Hurricane Scale  Courtesy of National Hurricane Center
Category Definition Effects
One Winds 74-95 mph No real damage to building structures. Damage primarily to unanchored mobile homes, shrubbery, and trees. Also, some coastal road flooding and minor pier da mage
Two Winds 96-110 mph Some roofing material, door, and window damage to buildings. Considerable damage to vegetation, mobile homes, and piers. Coastal and low-lying escape routes flood 2-4 hours before arrival of center. Small craft in unprotected anchorages break moorings.
Three Winds 111-130 mph Some structural damage to small residences and utility buildings with a minor amount of curtainwall failures. Mobile homes are destroyed. Flooding near the coast destroys smaller structures with larger structures damaged by floating debris. Terrain continuously lower than 5 feet ASL may be flooded inland 8 miles or more.
Four Winds 131-155 mph More extensive curtainwall failures with some complete roof structure failure on small residences. Major erosion of beach. Major damage to lower floors of structures near the shore. Terrain continuously lower than 10 feet ASL may be flooded requiring massive evacuation of residential areas inland as far as 6 miles.
Five Winds greater than 155 mph Complete roof failure on many residences and industrial buildings. Some complete building failures with small utility buildings blown over or away. Major damage to lower floors of all structures located less than 15 feet ASL and within 500 yards of the shoreline.Massive evacuation of residential areas on low ground within 5 to 10 miles of the shoreline may be required.

The 30 costliest tropical cyclones to strike the U.S. mainland  Updated by Tornado Tim

Rank Hurricane Year Category Damage
1 Katrina LA, MS, AL, FL 2005 4 +80,000,000,000
2 Andrew (SE FL, SE LA) 1992 5a 26,500,000,000
3 Hugo (SC) 1989 4 7,000,000,000
4 Floyd (Mid Atlantic & NE U.S.) 1999 2 4,500,000,000
5 Fran (NC) 1996 3 3,200,000,000
6 Opal (NW FL, AL) 1995 3 3,000,000,000
7 Georges (FL Keys, MS, AL) 1998 2 2,310,000,000
8 Frederic (AL, MS) 1979 3 2,300,000,000
9 Agnes (FL, NE U.S.) 1972 1 2,100,000,000
10 Alicia (N TX) 1983 3 2,000,000,000
11 Bob (NC, NE U.S.) 1991 2 1,500,000,000
12 Juan (LA) 1985 1 1,500,000,000
13 Camille (MS, SE LA, VA) 1969 5 1,420,700,000
14 Betsy (SE FL, SE LA) 1965 3 1,420,500,000
15 Elena (MS, AL, NW FL) 1985 3 1,250,000,000
16 Gloria (Eastern US) 1985 3b 900,000,000
17 Diane (NE U.S.) 1955 1 831,700,000
18 Bonnie (NC, VA) 1998 2 720,000,000
19 Erin (NW FL) 1995 2 700,000,000
20 Allison (N TX) 1989 TSc 500,000,000
21 Alberto (NW FL, GA, AL) 1994 TSc 500,000,000
22 Frances (TX) 1998 TSc 500,000,000
23 Eloise (NW FL) 1975 3 490,000,000
24 Carol (NE U.S.) 1954 3b 461,000,000
25 Celia (S TX) 1970 3 453,000,000
26 Carla (N & Central TX) 1961 4 408,000,000
27 Claudette (N TX) 1979 TSc 400,000,000
28 Gordon (S & Central FL, NC) 1994 TSc 400,000,000
29 Donna (FL, Eastern U.S.) 1960 4 387,000,000
30 David (FL, Eastern U.S.) 1979 2 320,000,000
31 Unnamed (New England) 1938 3b 306,000,000

Credit (AOML) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Updated by Tornado Tim Posted Dec. 2005

 
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